Last year we reviewed the horror movie sequels “Harvest of Fear” and “Path of Evil,” and to say that we weren’t very kind would be an understatement. We pretty relentlessly mocked both movies. Now it’s our chance to see if we can take what we give when we speak with Ted Pfeifer, co-writer of both films, about his experience writing and acting in the films, as well as his experience listening to us trash his movies. Join us on this very special clapback episode of Portland at the Movies.

What can we say about “Brain Smasher: A Love Story,” starring Andrew “Dice” Clay and Teri Hatcher? Whatever we’d say, we’d have to say it in an impenetrably thick Brooklyn accent even though we live in Portland, just like the Diceman. Is it a comedy? An action movie? A satire? We dive into this straight-to-video (except for the theatrical release in Brazil) on this month’s episode.

On a very special episode of Portland at the Movies, we speak to the one-and-only David Walker. If you’ve been a listener to our show, you’ve noticed that about 75% of them involve hearing David Walker’s name in some capacity: he’s one of the only carriers of the torch of the 1980s burgeoning indie movie scene in Portland, which led to the breakout careers of filmmakers like Gus Van Sant and Penny Allen. Join us as well talk with David about everything from his prolific current career as a comic book writer, and how he got his start as “Sanchez” in the Portland cult classic “Fatal Revenge.”


To find out more about David, visit any local comic book store, or visit https://davidfwalker.com/

  • Dying to fashion: David F. Walker gets blown away in “Fatal Revenge.”

Last Halloween, we were spooked by how terrible a little movie called “Harvest of Fear,” made in Estacada, Oregon, was. And now we’re back at it with its sequel, “Path of Evil,” which came out a year later. Will the sequel correct the errors of the first movie, or will it end up on our pile of motion picture corpses that should be put out of their misery? Turn down the lights and get out that Halloween candy, because we’re about ready to find out.

Is it possible to write a movie whose dialogue consists solely of ham-fisted doctor puns? Is it necessary to film an entire movie in a tiny park in unincorporated SW Portland even though it mostly takes place indoors, and Oregon is never even mentioned or seen? Why does this movie even exist? Join us as we demand answers from the 1992 horror/slasher film “Dr. Giggles,” the first movie production of Portland’s own Dark Horse Comics. [Insert medical pun here]

Portland at the Movies is a hilarious new podcast that takes an in-depth look at some of the questionable movies made in and around Portland (think How Did This Get Made with movies filmed in Portland). Our first episode centers on the made-for-TV Disney Channel movie Halloweentown, filmed in St. Helens, Oregon. Join us for a funny look at a deeply confusing Halloween classic, where we discuss everything from a little town’s inherent cruelty towards children to the nonsensical monsters and characters that inhabit Halloweentown.

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